Bike’n Hike (IV): Jirisan National Park / Hallyeohaesang National Park (Namhae-Do) / Suncheon Bay

Destination:  Jirisan National Park / Hallyeohaesang National Park (Namhae-Do) / Suncheon Bay 
Cycling:  370km
Hiking:  0km
Days:  4
 
 

I skipped hiking these parks during this ride only because I wanted use my time to establish a cycling route.  If you combined hiking all of these parks, it would be upwards of an eight or nine day trip (and grueling!).  If you focused on just one park and rode there and back, it would be more of a traditional three-day Bike’n Hike.  And of course there are multiple variations in between that allow quite a bit of flexibility.  Jirisan is the toughest in terms of hiking.  Hallyeohaesang (Namhae-Do) is toughest in terms of cycling (new roads currently under construction will make this ride much easier in the future!).  I will present the route as I rode it, a four-day ride, but will make a note of different options at the end of each day.

 On the way to Jirisan
 
 Just outside Gurye

Day 1: Jirisan National Park
Click here for the cyclemeter link.

Pick up 887 right in front of the village and head towards Goseo (6km) where you’ll get on road 60.  Follow this to 13 and then to 27 and back to 60.  Not nearly as complicated as it sounds!  These roads are nothing special, but no major climbs or dangerous traffic either so not a bad start to the day.  In Gokseong you’ll pick up 17, which follows a gorgeous river and offers an option of a bike path (better than most bikes paths in Korea, but oddly confusing at times).  Lots of pensions along this ride and a nice end to the day.  Follow signs to Gurye, the town at the base of Jirisan National Park, where you have the option of staying in a motel (여일 motel was very friendly, let me keep my bike in the lobby and was only 30 bucks) or pressing on the extra few kilometers to the park where you have the option of tent camping. 
Note:  For a three-day Bike’n Hike, you would basically hike the park on day two and head back the way you came on day three.  
 
 Heading to Namhae
 Coastal views on Namhae Island
 
 Hallyeohaesang National Park

Day 2:  Hallyeohaesang National Park (Namhae-Do)

Click here for the cyclemeter link. 
This was by far the most challenging day.  It’s long at 98km and has some tough climbs.  The biggest one being at the very end of ride, just before you get to the beach.  The biggest problem though, is the construction on Namhae island.  It makes for a stressful ride, at least for now.  The park and beach are both incredible so if you’re still interested, please read on. 

Leaving Gurye is a fantastic ride along a scenic river with very few distractions.  You can either follow road 861, which follows the south side of the river, or road 19, which follows the north side of the river.  There seemed to be a bit less traffic on road 861, but you’ll eventually pick up road 19 a couple of hours later in Hadong anyway, so the choice is yours.  The next couple of hours along road 19 aren’t the greatest in terms of scenic beauty, but not exactly challenging either.  Things change dramatically when you cross the bridge onto Namhae island.  Road 19 takes you all the way to the beach, but there is a considerable amount of construction along the way and a fair amount of traffic as well.  Not the greatest combination.  The climbs towards the end of the ride are pretty tough, but the downhill into Sangju Beach makes it all worth it.  Plenty of minbaks around if you want to treat yourself.  Tent camping is available for about 7,000 won (?).  Showers cost 2,000.  Hallyeohaesang National Park is right behind the beach (follow 19 back up the mountain…trail head is about halfway up on the right).  The hike to the top is pretty easy and only about 2km.  Amazing views of the coast await!

Note:  A considerably easier option would be to head directly south to Suncheon/Suncheon Bay for the day.  The route in “Day 4” of this ride will take you back to Damyang making a nice loop and effectively cutting out Namhae-Do.  
Suncheon Bay
Suncheon Bay
Suncheon Bay

Day 3: Suncheon (Bay)
Click here for the cyclemeter link.

The ride from Namhae to Suncheon is honestly another argument in support of cutting out the Namhae portion of this ride and heading straight to Suncheon (Bay) from Jirisan.  Besides the construction I mentioned, this route also takes you through the bowels of Gwangyang’s industrial zone.  Namhae is absolutely gorgeous so if you have a couple of nights to stick around and enjoy the beach/hiking, it’s probably worth it.  If you’re going just for the night, probably not-so-much…

Head back the way you came on road 19 (nothing better than starting the day off with a nice climb up the mountain!).  Stay on 19 until well after you cross the bridge…look for 59 and take a left.  This will take you south through the ship building yards I mentioned and ultimately through Suncheon’s neighboring city of Gwangyang.  59 somehow turns into road 2 in the ship-building yards and the twists and turns through this area are a bit tricky.  Keep a map handy.  Road 2 takes you into Suncheon where you have the option of posting up for the night in a motel (the 프라자모텔 motel let me keep my bike in my room and only charged me 30 bucks for the night!) or pressing on to Suncheon Bay, which is about 10km south of the city and offers a surprising number of options in terms of pensions and restaurants.  The photos here are from Suncheon Bay, but I actually did this on Day 4 so click the link below for directions.  

Countryside outside of Suncheon

Heading to Damyang
Dongbok Lake

Day 4:  The Damyang House
Click here for the cyclemeter link.

Beers and fried chicken kept me in Suncheon city the night before so I opted to explore Suncheon Bay in the morning before heading back to Damyang.  This easily added an extra 20km to the day, but was well worth it to see the park…it’s stunning. Click on the link for directions to the Bay.

Out of Suncheon you have a few options depending on where you’re coming from, but you somehow need to find 17 and/or ultimately road 22 heading north out of the city.  Road 22 takes you through a gorgeous mountain pass and provides excellent cycling for the duration you’re on this road.  In Dongbok Myeon (74km marker) you’ll pick up road 15 which take you toward Dongbok Lake.  This is my stomping grounds so Naver maps and I had a disagreement about how to approach the last 20km or so.  Naver maps will take you a bit further on 15 and take you up a brutal mountain pass (it’s epic from the other direction!).  I suggest taking the road the follows the west side of the lake (not sure of the name!) until you pick up road 887 which takes you back to the house.  This road is not only more scenic, but the climbs are short and sweet making it a more fun road to ride.  Traffic is minimal as well, save for the occasional (massive) construction vehicles.

Looking for something a bit easier?  Plenty of other suggestions can be found here.

Bike’n Hike (II): Naejangsan National Park

Destination:  Naejangsan National Park
Cycling: 120km
Hiking:  15km
Days:  3


Overview:  Day 1 is a pretty easy ride (50km) with only one notable climb and the most epic downhill imaginable bringing you into the park.  Day 2 is a ball busting hike (15km) around the ridge of the National Park.  Day 3 starts of with a nice climb (45 min of nothing but up) out of the valley and a fairly tiring ride back to The Damyang House (70km). Info about Bike’n Hike VI (the two day version of the is trip) can be found here.
Day 1 (Cycling)
Click here to access the Cyclemeter link
The first 18kms are spent on road 887 which is ideal for a number of reasons, first and foremost being that this road passes right in front of the village.  On top of that, it’s relatively flat and after navigating the jog in the road near the overpass (between km 10-12), it’s an easy hour of cycling with very little traffic to worry about.  Around the 18km mark you’ll pick up route 15, which is an underused four-lane road with at least one uphill climb through a small valley.  After that, it’s mostly downhill to Bukhamyeon, which is where you will pick up route 49 leading into the park (around the 35km mark).  The next 15km on route 49 are pretty amazing as you’ll find both the biggest climb and the biggest descent of the day (test your brakes!).
The last downhill of the day bombs into the park where you’ll find minbaks, a campground and exactly one street of restaurants serving the same menu.  Peak season here is very clearly advertised as fall, and visiting outside of that time frame you will find a very deserted Naejangsan.  The CU Mart is by far the most “happening” place to hangout.  Minbaks are about 30,000/night outside of peak season.
 
Day 2 (Hiking)

There is a shuttle bus from the initial entrance of the park (near the main street of restaurants) to the visitor center, trailheads and cable cars.  It’s only 1,000 won and if you have a car probably not of much use, but the walk along this road is very easy and beautiful (follows a mountain stream) so if your car ends up at one end you have this as an option.

Keep in mind there are essentially two ways to hike the rim trail.  Clockwise or counterclockwise.  They both entail a brutal climb to reach the rim (over an hour of straight up), but after that there isn’t too much difference.  My suggestion is to take the cable car halfway up the mountain and head directly to sinseonbong, the highest peak. From there hike the rim clockwise.  You’ll miss the first peak, but honestly this will make things much easier by the end of the hike when you’re feeling exhausted.  Besides there is a scenic overlook every five seconds so it’s not like you’d be missing out on much! 

This hike isn’t easy and it’s not short (although there are at least three trails connecting with the rim trail that allow you to ‘opt out’ and head back down).  Plan for at least 7 or 8 hours if you want to do the whole thing. 


Day 3 (Cycling)
Click here to access the Cyclemeter link.
Grab some breakfast or a snack and head towards Jeong-eup and out of the park.  This starts your 70km ride home.  Pick up 21 about five kilometers outside of the park (this is not clearly marked!  Look for the tall red love motel) and start your climb through the valley.  This is the biggest climb of the day, but not the only one.  This road will bring you south passed Chuwolsan Park, Damyang Lake and into Damyang City.  Stop in town at 승일식당 to try some of Damyang’s famous kalbi, or simply pass through town, pick up road 887 and head back to the house for a well deserved cold beverage. 

Restaurant Review: Damyang Flower Ddeokgalbi (담양애 꽃 떡갈비)

I’m sure you’re painfully aware, like the rest of us, that Damyang is equally famous for and proud of the minced meat paddies known as ddeokgalbi (떡갈비).  It’s ubiquitous.  Personally I find most of it overpriced and not all that great.  In fact my favorite ddeokgalbi in Damyang can be found at a restaurant known for grilled fish (Dega/대가).

 

Damyang “Flower” Ddeokgalbi was recently referred to me by a friend, but has been on my radar for awhile because it’s consistently busy.  It’s hard to ignore their success.  So…I’ll save you the effort of reading the rest of this post:  it’s surprisingly clean, delicious, well priced and a place I’ll gladly take out-of-towners when they want to try some of the local flavors.

 


Walking in the restaurant it was instantly clear that it’s much bigger than it looks.  That explains the seemingly large parking lot in front!  Before you’re seated you’ll have to choose your set menu.  Pretty easy as it’s a ddeokgalbi restaurant serving ddeokgalbi.  Basically choose between beef, pork or a mix of both (the mix is recommended…called 반반정식, or the top right of the menu).


Once seated things start to happen pretty fast.  The banchan comes out first and is pretty damn impressive.  It consists of a lot of the usual suspects (kimches and namools) and is fresh and flavorful.  The server will recommend which to eat with the ddeokgalbi, but you’d be hard pressed to mix something “incorrectly”.

 

 


Shortly after, the ddeokgalbi will arrive.  Don’t panic if you’re trying to maintain that plus-size figure as additional paddies are cheap at 3,000 for pork and 6,000 for beef!

 


To top it off you’ll get some soup (된장), a bit of fish (고등어) and rice with bamboo shoots (죽순).

 


Dessert is where things got a bit weird.  Purple sweet potato tea anyone?


All said and done it was 30,000 for two people and we were stuffed.  Add some booze and an extra order of ddeokgalbi and you’re still under 50k for a memorable dinner.  At 13km, it’s also a quick drive or a scenic bike ride!  Here’s the directions and here’s the view:

 

 


Looking for something else?  Plenty of other restaurant recommendations can be found here.

TDH Updates: 11-19-14

We’re gearing up for winter and the colder months ahead!

The cold weather pretty much guarantees you’ll be spending considerably more time indoors during your visit.  Not to worry.  We’ve updated the entertainment center with a sweet 55″ smart TV and the full 5.1 surround sound experience is now hooked up and ready to go.  No neighbors to complain, so don’t be shy with that sub-woofer!!  Feel free to bring your favorite movies, or dig through the 200 or so we have on tap.  14,000 songs as well, and the music sounds just as good on those speakers.

This heating pad doesn’t look like much, but it will make all the difference during your stay.  The caste-iron fire place will keep it toasty well into the night, but inevitably, it’ll burn out and the temperature will drop.  You won’t notice at all!  (don’t worry, there are space heaters and ondol in addition to the fireplace and heating pad.  You won’t be cold!)

Those of you visiting in groups larger than two will appreciate the new sleeping pads and blankets we’ve organized.  Guests 3 through 6 will have to fight over floor space in the living room, but we can at least promise a good night’s rest.

Hope to see you soon!

Restaurant Review: Vietnam Restaurant and Mart

Spring Rolls

Fried Spring Rolls

Pho Bo

Pho Bo

What this place lacks in decor and ambiance, it makes up for in authenticity and taste.  Don’t be fooled by the dilapidated exterior of the building and the exposed kitchen and appliances indoors.  They’re serving Vietnamese food miles beyond what you’ll find in Gwangju (those Vietnamese chain restaurants basically serve Korean food for twice the price).

 

 

Walking in, I was met by a small Vietnamese server and a handful of younger Vietnamese friends having lunch…always a good sign to see actual Vietnamese people in a Vietnamese restaurant.  Rumors of Bahn Mi sandwiches proved false (possibly sold out?)  (update: been back a couple of times and still no Bahn Mi sandwiches) so we opted for the litmus test of Vietnamese food:  Pho and Spring Rolls.

It wasn’t cheap at 24,000 for two people, but two bowls of soup and a plate of spring rolls was more than enough to fill us up and ultimately well worth the price.  Simply put, it was delicious. (The fresh spring rolls are better than the fried)

This place is also a mart selling Vietnamese snacks and ingredients.  The mart is in the back, where you will also find additional seating.  The best part is they sell fresh cilantro if you ask nicely…2,000 for a large handful.

The location is pretty easy to find as it’s close to the river, noodle street, and one of the most famous restaurants in town, SeungIl Shikdang (승일 식당).  Here’s the google map link.  Just in case, here’s the map from my phone:

If you have room for dessert, head down to the river and get in line with the rest of these suckers and buy some of the “famous” Damyang donuts 🙂

 

Hiking: Jishil Valley (The Mountains Behind The House)

This is the 5km dog-friendly hike I’ll recommend to you when you visit and be secretly disappointed when you provide some thin excuse the next day as to why you couldn’t fit it in your schedule.  My disappointment lies in the fact that this trail is nearly perfect in so many ways.

For starters, it offers more “bang for your buck” than any trail in the area.  It’s got a bamboo forest, a pine forest, giant boulders, ancient pagodas and a pretty amazing overlook just towards the end that acts as the cherry on top (it’s all downhill from there!).

Spring

Summer

Fall

Winter

Next, it’s extremely accessible.  The trailhead is in the front yard (literally) and the trail ends just on the other side of the village.  No need to walk along the busy main road, ride a bike or drive anywhere.

 

 Start at 12 (the house) finish at 1 (Shikyoungjung)

Lastly, it’s the perfect length; long, but not too long.  At around 2 hours, it’s just long enough to make it feel like you accomplished something and earned that second helping of chicken pot pie.  You can even cheat and head straight up to the overlook by doing the hike in reverse.  From the front door you can be looking out over the entire valley and Mudeung National Park while enjoying a cup of makoli in less than 20 minutes (double that if you’re my wife).

 

The hike itself is fairly easy to navigate, but here’s the play by play just to help eliminate a least one of the more common excuses (getting lost).

In the front yard, to the left of the fence, you’ll find the trail.  This trail runs behind the fence and out to the road in the village so it’s not uncommon to see hikers passing through.

The trail from the front yard

The trail leading into the bamboo forest

This trail leads through a thick bamboo forest that gradually thins out as you go up the mountain.  Even if you’re not interested in hiking the whole trail, do yourself a favor and at least walk through the bamboo forest.  It’s what Damyang is famous for and pretty cool to have right at your fingertips.  Bonus points if you go in there at night (spoiler alert: it’s terrifying).

At the top of the first climb, you’ll come to a small ridge and a trail marker.  Here’s the secret to this hike: take a left EACH time you see one of these trail markers.  That will loop you back around the valley to the other side of the village.

 


As I mentioned, after the first climb and at the first trail marker you’ll take a left (always a left) and continue up the mountain (if you take a right you’ll end up at Sosaewon).  It’s a fair bit of uphill, but I promise it’s worth it.  It gets rocky towards the  top and you’ll start realizing how high up you are!

 


After a couple of left turns and a couple of climbs/descents, you’ll end up at the overlook.  There are actually two overlooks.  The one on the left overlooks the Jishil Valley and of course Mudeung National Park.

 

 

 

The overlook on the right provides views of Gwangju Lake.

 

 

The overlook is a good place to relax and soak in the views.  It’s all downhill from here back to the house so take a break and continue down the trail when you’re ready.  When you reach the pine forest you’re very near the end of the trail and its ultimate destination:  The National Heritage site of Shikyungjung.


As you exit the pine forest continue walking towards the pagoda and ultimately down the stone staircase.

 


This small park has four or five pagodas and is a popular tourist attraction for the bus loads of Korean tourists that visit during the summer.  It also attracts a lot of photographers and can be very scenic with dramatic changes throughout the year.  Here’s my best effort:

 

 


From Shikyungjung you will be able to see the poetry museum.  Behind the museum you will find a small village road that will take you back to the house and offer one last glimpse of Mudeung National Park.

Poetry Museum

If you have a bit more time and energy, walk across to the Eco-Park and watch the sun set!  Enjoy.

 

 

Hiking: Mudeung National Park – Hidden Lake (dog friendly)

Update:  This “trail” is also a pretty sweet off-roading adventure if you have a four-wheel option!

Here’s another suggestion for a shorter “bike’n hike” outing that can be done in an afternoon without leaving you exhausted at the end of the day.  At around a dozen kilometers, this one is even shorter than the Wonhyosa Valley hike I previously suggested, yet still gets you off the beaten path and into some of the more remote corners of Mudeung National Park.  Don’t be fooled by some of the gloomy weather and crappy phone camera…it’s a beautiful hike and besides a few local farmers, completely unknown and void of the day trippers swarming to the Eco-Park.

From the house you have a few options on how to get to the back entrance of the Eco-Park, where you’ll find the road leading to the trailhead.  A bike will take you the 4km pretty quickly and is a no-brainer as you’ll be using the main roads.  If time is on your side, I would suggest walking there via the rice paddies or by entering the main entrance of Eco-Park and walking through the park itself (ideally a combination of both).

Because I had my dog (another dog friendly hike!), I opted for the rice paddy route on the way there and the main roads on the way back (2-3 hours total).  Here’s the cyclemter link to help you get your bearings.  And here’s instructions:

Walk out to the main road and take a right.  Take a quick left across the small service road that crosses the river.

 


Take a left when it dead-ends on the other side of the river and take the first left after that down this service road into the rice paddies (these turns are all very quick).


Follow this service road around through the rice paddies until you reach the cows in the blue stable.  It’s gorgeous out here in nicer weather!


When you reach the cows take a right up the little hill.  At the top you’ll have views of all the surrounding mountains, including Mudeung.


Just after the top of the hill you’ll want to take the first left down towards the middle school and a right at the intersection in front of the middle school.  Again, these are all quick turns.


This will take you around to the Eco-Park parking lot and this fancy 7-11 where you can grab some snacks and drinks to take with you on your hike.


At the main road in front of the 7-11 you should take a left…you should be walking away from the Eco-Park main entrance and parking lot.  This road will take you toward the back entrance of the park (you could walk through the park itself if you don’t have a dog with you!).  You’ll also walk past this restaurant (황가내), which is a good place to stop for lunch if you’re hungry before or after your hike (the tofu is made in-house and infused with green tea…the kimche jiggae is 6,000 and AMAZING).


Just past this restaurant you’ll see a small road and bus stop.  Turn here (right) and walk up the hill to the back entrance of Eco-Park.

 


This road leading up to and past the back entrance of Eco-Park will take you around to the lesser known side of Gwangju Lake.  It’s a quiet walk/cycle along this road with a few small hills.  Great fishing on this side of the lake as well so keep that in mind when you see small trails leading off the road down towards the bank of the lake.

 

 

 

Same road in nicer weather (although winter)

Keep walking until you see this road/trail on your left.  This will take you to the hidden lake.  Once on this road it’s a straight shot with no turnoffs so pretty easy from this point.  This trailhead is only a couple of kilometers from the back entrance of the Eco-Park.

 

A better look at the sign at the turnoff to the hidden lake.

Follow this trail (it’s more of a road…probably used by local farmers) up through the valley.  You’ll eventually enter Mudeung National Park.

 

Once you reach the lake, you’ll find a small trail in between the lake and the rice paddies which will take you around the lake (clockwise).  Pretty easy as it’s not a huge lake.  The trail on the opposite side from the rice paddies is more pronounced and easier to follow.  The trail on the side of the rice paddies tends to get overgrown in the summer months.

From here it’s all downhill back to the house and you get to enjoy the scenic valley views the entire way!  Enjoy.

Looking for something a bit more ON the beaten path?  Plenty of other suggestions can be found here.

Hiking: Mudeung National Park – Wonhyosa Valley

Unfortunate as it it, not everyone has the time (or the desire) for a multi-day, triple digit mileage cycling and hiking adventure.  In an effort not to alienate the majority voice, I’m doing my best to map out some bike’n hike themed afternoon excursions that won’t leave you cursing the surrounding mountains.

The cycling portion of this trip is a quick 4km bike ride to and from the trailhead and the hike up through the valley to the final destination of Wonhyosa is another 4kms each way with modest elevation gains (for a total of 16km…click here for the cylcemeter link).  You could easily bookend this trip with a tour through the Eco-Park near the house and lunch at one of the many bori-bap restaurants near Wonhyosa in order to fill out the afternoon.  Alternatively, you could use this as a first step to a much larger hike through Mudeung National Park as Wonhyosa is home to a variety of trail-heads that put you within striking distance of just about every corner of the park.

The Wonhyosa Valley hike makes use of two of the lesser know trailheads tucked away down a gravel road near the entrance of Buncheongware museum (pottery) and right down the street from Eco-Park.  The Pungam entrance is certainly the busier of the two and can even get a bit crowded during the summer months due to the infamous Mudung swimming holes found in the valley.

To get there, grab a bike and head out to the main road.  Take a left.  Take the first right across the bridge and follow this wooden duck lined road (called 속대) around the rice paddy filled valley.

 

 


Take a left at the first intersection and another quick left at the museum road entrance.


This road has seen better days so take it slow and avoid the massive pot-holes!  Thankfully you’re not going far…take the first left down this little service road.


Follow this road to the gate and lock up your bikes (but don’t lock them to the gate as this is still an active service road which I believe goes through the entire park.  Definitely looking forward to sneaking my bike up here!).

 


You can see the trailhead sign just in front of my bike.  Follow this trail through the forest until you see this pogoda:

Head down past the pogoda, but don’t cross the river just yet.  Continue up the valley on this side of the river until you see rock stairs guiding you down to the river.  This is where you should cross.

Head up the river bank on the other side (you should eventually be walking away from the river) until you come out on a gravel road.  You should see a sign marker for Wonhyosa at this point.  This junction connects the two trails and completes the loop portion of the hike…if that first part seems too confusing just park your bikes at the end of this trail (Pungam entrance) and hike in and out at the same place.Follow the signs up through the valley toward Wonhyosa.  Navigating all the guerrilla farmers is a bit tricky, but I sort of love that they’re all here in the middle of a national park.  I suspect they were grandfathered in as this was only recently given national park status.  This dude even has cctv cameras!


The rest of the trail is well marked and always within earshot of the river.  Depending on the season, you’ll want to keep your eyes peeled for secluded swimming holes or picnic areas.  The valley is filled with them and the further up the valley you go, the less likely you are to be disturbed by the hordes of families fighting over picnic space near the Pungam entrance.

 

 


At the top you’ll run into yet another old service road.  Plenty of signage at this point so just head toward Wonhyosa and cross the old bridge.

 


From here you’re close to Wonhyosa temple, the ranger station and all the restaurants.  You have a few choices to make…either grab some lunch, head back down or continue on up the mountain!  It’s a quick and easy hike back down through the valley and an even easier bike ride back to the house.

 

 

 

It’s all downhill to the house 🙂

 

Homemade Pizzas From Scratch

With so many healthy distractions around it’s easy to overlook something as standard as a kitchen.  Especially during BBQ season.  I can tell you, however, that after a decade plus of living in Korea our kitchen is far from standard.  The biggest benefit of remodeling this dump (see the before photos here) was that we could correct a lot of the “mistakes” the original designer made.  Believe it or not this kitchen used to be a separate closed-in room in the back of the house.

Besides having enough space for more than one grown human to cook in, the kitchen is also well stocked with all sorts of fun tools to help make you feel like you know what you’re doing.  You’d be surprised at what I’ve dragged back with me after my yearly visit to the States (cast iron sausage grinder for starters).  Here’s my collection of pizza tools, which although not 100% necessary, sure do make the experience infinitely more enjoyable and efficient (Butcher’s block, pizza cutter, pizza stone handle, pizza peel, pizza stone and rolling pin).

Not saying I have the best pizza in the world, but I will say it’s pretty damn tasty, always a crowd pleaser and crazy cheap compared to what the local “Italian” restaurants are charging.  Basic recipes and procedure below.  Consider it on your next visit!

Sauce
Sure, you could use spaghetti sauce, but that’s not impressing anyone.  Not to mention making it from scratch takes about five minutes and is nearly impossible to screw up.  Put these ingredients in the blender and give them a good mix before cooking it down (simmer for 45 min).  

1 can tomato sauce
2 cans whole peeled tomatoes
1 large onion (caramelized)
2 bulbs of garlic (roasted)
1 spoonful of tomato paste
1 spoonful of chopped oregano
1 spoonful of chopped basil
1 spoonful of red pepper flakes
1 spoonful of sugar
Healthy pinch of salt
Healthy pour of olive oil

Obviously the recipe is flexible so add/subtract to taste.  Roasting the garlic is also an extra, but I usually roast some to use as a pizza topping anyway and like the taste of it in the sauce.  Do yourself a favor and cut the ends off before drizzling them with olive oil, salt, and pepper, wrapping them in foil and cooking them for 35 minutes at 230 degrees.  Yum.

Dough
Every recipe for dough looks similar so don’t put too much thought into it.  The tricky part is remembering to make it in advance, preferably the night before. 

6 cups flour
2 1/3 cups water
20g salt
20g sugar
15g dry yeast
Healthy pour of olive oil

Mix it all together and let it sit, covered, in a warm place until it has time rise at least once. 

Toppings
This can be a bit labor intensive, so now would be a good time to get the rest of the team involved.  Plenty of knives and cutting boards around so give everyone a vegetable and have them start chopping while you man the stove and cook everything down.  It’s pizza so there are no rules.  Here’s my usual set-up:

Veg:  Onions, mushrooms, black olives, bell peppers, and spinach

Cheese:  Cheddar and mozzarella (mixed),  Goat cheese (separate)

Meat:  Homemade spicy Italian sausage (10,000won/250g), anchovies

 Here’s what my work station looks like~

Procedure
Once everything is organized you can start cranking out a pizza every 15 minutes.  Pizza by nature is a casual food (at least at my house!) so we usually eat while we cook.

Roll out the dough while the oven is preheating to the highest temperature possible, usually 250 degrees.  The pizza stone should be in the oven.

 

Sprinkle corn meal on the pizza peel (or dust with flour) to prevent the dough from sticking.  Gently transfer the rolled dough from the counter to the pizza peel. The dough should “slide” around on the pizza peel when you snap your wrist.  If it sticks you’re never going to get it in the oven!

Sauce the dough and add whatever toppings you want.  I usually keep it simple, never adding more than three toppings.  Do NOT add the cheese yet as it will typically burn if it’s in the oven too long.

When the oven is ready to go you simply need to slide the pizza from the peel to the stone.  Not always as easy as it looks.  It takes a couple of tries to get the hang of it.  Let the pizza cook for about 10 minutes (this will vary depending on how thick the crust is…these times are based on a thin crust).

When the pizza is nearly finished, grab the pizza stone handle and remove the pizza/stone and place it on the stove top.  Cover the pizza in cheese and return it to the oven for a couple of minutes.  When the cheese is melted it’s ready to eat.  Slide the pizza off of the pizza stone directly onto the butcher’s block, slice and eat while you start prepping the next pizza.

Enjoy!

Spicy Italian Sausage, Onion, Yellow Peppers, Mozzarella/Cheddar Cheese:

Spinach, Mushroom ,Onion, Goat Cheese:

“The Vegetarian” (Mushroom, Onion, Spinach, Bell Peppers and Mozzarella/Cheddar Cheese)

“Breakfast Pizza” (Homemade American Breakfast Sausage (sage), Onions, Sunny-Side Up Egg, Mozzarella/Cheddar Cheese)

“Garbage Pizza/Calzone” (Last pizza of the night…all the remaining ingredients!)

Restaurant Review: Changpyeong GukBap Restaurant (국밥)

Gukbap is one of many foods Damyang claims to be famous for and Changpyeong, just down the road, is the epicenter of it all.  Unlike ddukgalbi, which overshadows all the less famous Damyang foods, gukbap is actually affordable and doesn’t come with a pretentious “fusion” theme (don’t get me started).  Quite the opposite actually.  At 6,000 won a bowl, Gukbap is some serious blue collar eats. Come here during lunch time any day of the week and you’ll see what I mean.

If you’re not a fan of the nasty bits, you’ll want to give this spot a pass because the menu is nothing but pork products.


“Changpyeong Gukbap” is one of the more popular gukbap restaurants around this area and is consistently packed.  To get there head down 887 to the Goseo intersection and take a right (about 6km).  The driveway entrance to the restaurant is about 100 meters down the road on your right.  The restaurant itself is tucked away and a bit difficult to see from the road so keep your eyes peeled for the tall blue roadside sign.  A map with this restarant labeled (and many others) can be found here.

Most people order the standard 국밥 (pictured below), but personally I prefer the 공나물국밥 (don’t worry, it also comes with plenty of organs as well).  Enjoy!